Tag Archives: Latin AMerican community

Latin Americans moving to the UK: How did cuts and migration policy reforms affect them?

Latin Americans that moved to the UK from EU countries with high unemployment rates are living in increasingly precarious circumstances – usually under financial hardship and even in debt.

These are the findings from a new report by Leeds University which illustrates the negative impact that cuts and immigration policy reforms have had on Latin American migrants that remigrated to the UK from EU countries.

According to the last census (2011), a third of Latin Americans living in the UK have lived before in another country of the European Union, the majority of them in Spain, Portugal and Italy, and have then remigrated to the UK after gaining EU citizenship.

Despite having EU passport, these newly arrived Latin Americans face a situation of “practical exclusion” from the public services, due to the lack of understanding of how the system works, the language barrier and the reduced number of outreach, interpreting and translating services in the public services after the recent cuts.

Furthermore, the reduction of public funding to the third sector has limited the capability of Latin American organisations to attend and cover the increase in the demand from new migrants.

The report also suggests that the lack of services tailored to the Latin American diaspora – who too often don’t understand the system and aren’t fully competent in the English language – leads to situations where:

The report, published by Leeds University in collaboration with the Latin American Women’s Right Service (LAWRS), also focuses on the impact that new migration policies have had on migrants’ access to public services, mostly by limiting the entitlement of the new arrivals to work benefits and access the healthcare system.

This shortage of resources has lead to vulnerable situations and a reliance on exploitative systems, worsening the financial hardship and the psychological impact that migration has in this particular group of the Latin American community, undermining their chances to secure a stable economic situation and better opportunities for future generations.

Finally, the report highlights how Latin American women suffer these difficulties especially, as they are often the main carers for children and family.

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This guest blog post was written by Beatriz Martinez, Deputy Editor and Community Manager for Latin Americans at Migreat.  

Read more on life and experiences of Latin American migrants living in the UK by joining the Migreat Latin American community!

Colombians achieve Schengen Visa exemption, as Peruvians wait and Bolivians start negotiations

Colombians no longer need to apply for a visa to enter the Schengen Area as visitors. The measure went into effect on the 3rd of December and put an end to months of negotiations between the European Union and the Colombian Government.

Colombians “reclaim their dignity” with the visa exemption

After the visa lift went in effect, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said that “Colombia’s dignity” has been reclaimed and thanked his Spanish counterpart Mariano Rajoy for having lobbied for the visa exemption.

Colombians will be able to travel to the Schengen Zone as visitors for up to 90 days to 22 of the 28 EU states – except for Ireland and the United Kingdom – and to Non-EU countries within the Schengen area, such as Norway, Liechtenstein, Iceland and Switzerland.  

Despite the exemption, Colombians will still be required to meet financial standards and show specific documents to prove that their journey is solely for short visit purposes and that they have no intention to overstay or carry out paid activities during their time in the Schengen Area.

According to the Colombian Association of Travel and Tourism (ANATO), the air traffic between Colombia and the EU it’s expected to grow by 15% to 20%, boosting the economy of European countries still in recession – such as Spain or Italy – and promoting the travel industry in Colombia.

Peruvian’s visa exemption stopped due to delays in biometric passports

Although Peruvians started the process alongside Colombians, their visa exemption has been stopped due to administrative issues, mostly related to the Peruvian government fail to issue biometric passports to their citizens on time – a vital requirement to ensure the highest levels of security.

However, the Representative of the EU for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini, reassured Peruvians that the visa exemption will be a reality for their country soon and that they will get the green light early next year.

Bolivians start promising negotiations with the European Union

Seeing the success of Peru and Colombia in achieving the visa exemption, the government of Evo Morales has started a process of diplomatic negotiations with the European Union to secure a similar agreement.

Although according to Ronald Schäfer, Director of the Department for the Americas of the European External Action Service, the exemption is “on its way”, sources involved in the process admit that it will take time to reach an agreement, considering that it depends on complex administrative procedures.

Applying for a Schengen visa? Get your free checklist of documents to apply online with Migreat

Ask the latino community in Europe for more information on the 7 most common motives of rejection of a schengen visa.

Photo credit: ©iStockphoto.com/Riki Risnandar

Latin American Community Day of Celebration of Migrants Contribution

The Latin American community in London organises a day of music and workshops to celebrate the invaluable contribution that migrant entrepreneurs, artists, musicians, professionals and organisations make to British society.

The event, happening at Elephant and Castle Shopping Centre and the Coronet on Saturday afternoon 28th March 2015 will bring for the first time the Latin American Community together.

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Tatiana Garavito, Migrants rights activist, Migrant women of the year 2014 who has been campaigning and advocating for Latin American migrants for over 10 years since she first arrived to the UK.
“We have decided to break the silence and show that migrant communities will stick to respect and love. Racism and xenophobia are too great a burden for us to bear” says Tatiana, Migrants rights activist  – and one of the leader of the #MigrantsContribute campaign.
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Over 40 organisations, groups and businesses are participating to the event under the #migrantContribute Umbrella.

A Symbolic Place

Elephant and Castle, often nicknamed ‘the Latin quarter’, is home to the largest and oldest Latin American business cluster in London.

There are 80 Latin American businesses in the Elephant and Castle area, each employing on average between 1-5 people, and attracting large number of visitors and customers to the area.

Elephant & Castle
Elephant & Castle

There are volunteering opportunities for people from the local community, if you are interested, please get in touch at migrantscontribute@gmail.com

Join Migreat and forty other organisations on March 28th. Enjoy workshops, exhibitions, musical and theatrical performances with Migreat to support the fight for Solidarity and Respect against racism and xenophobia

For more information about the event or to arrange interviews on the day, please contact Tatiana Garavito.