Immigration Bill 2015: Who will be affected

The Immigration bill has passed it’s second reading in the House of Commons and is now being sent to a Public Bill Committee. It received 323 votes to 274 with considerable opposition from Labour, Lib Dem and SNP MPs.

Speaking of the large number of immigration changes that have been made since Theresa May has become Home Secretary they argued that it will not reduce illegal immigration and will damage social cohesion.

Who it will affect and why

  • Workers

Those who are found working illegally in England and Wales could face up to six months in jail. The police would be able to seize wages as ‘proceeds of crime’.

Public sector jobs will require fluent English language or else will be barred by public authorities.

  • Businesses

The jail sentence for employers found guilty will be raised from 2 years to 5 years in addition to fines in place.

In addition, the UK will introduce an immigration skills charge for employers who preferentially employ skilled migrants from abroad. This visa levy on businesses was created to further enforce the British Labour Resident Market Test. This test ensures that any migrant hired in the UK is not taking the job of a UK resident by imposing the business to advertise the job position for 28 days in the UK on listed local websites before being able to offer the job to a non-EU migrant.

  • Families

All immigration appeals and judicial reviews are subject to deport first, appeal later measures with the right to private and family life appeals included. This means migrants can face removal from the UK despite an outstanding appeal to their case. This process is likely to be practically difficult and will separate families.

With banks, police, DVLA and landlords given the task and responsibility to check immigration status, families could easily find various aspects of their life surveilled. With many legally staying in the UK but unable to prove a ‘right to rent’, families also risk being mistakenly evicted.

  • Students

May in her speech at the Conservative Party Conference argued ‘Students, yes; over-stayers, no. universities must make this happen.’

Those students found working when a person ‘has no leave’ or when work or a specific type of work is not allowed will be liable to imprisonment and/or a fine as well as in many cases, immigration sanctions.

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