Migrant Entrepreneurs need mobile office and co-working spaces

Migrant Entrepreneurship and work mobility supported by the multiplication of open co-working spaces & networks in Europe.

The thriving London Tech City - London East London is becoming the hub for global entrepreneurs and businesses to meet, work and live
The thriving London Tech City – London East London is becoming the hub for global entrepreneurs and businesses to meet, work and live

London tech city counts 36 incubators for small businesses and 70 co-working space. A spark contrast to five years ago when this number was closer to below the two figures number.

Paris created a wiki out of all the spaces it offers for mobile and small businesses. Berlin has a map. London start-up community even created a spreadsheet of venues for events.

It all seems to signal a new generation of workers, businesses and entrepreneurs are embracing mobility and flexible office spaces.

These co-working space have benefited to one class of workers: the migrant entrepreneurs. When one was before stuck having to rely on family and ethnic migrant networks to find a space, open a bank account and wait for internet to be provided to its new office space, it is now possible for an entrepreneur from India to land overnight in a nice, crowded and high speed internet connected space in Central London given a small few.

Growth led by demand and need

Hector, founder of included.co, a company focused on creating even more value in shared & co-working spaces, explains this growth by “the frustration of a generation with the money and time usually wasted in finding the right providers” and their “need to focus on growth and product – while the rest is taken care of, without breaking the bank”.

Included.co was started last year in Cyprus and quickly expanded in Greece, France, UK, Germany and even Hong-Kong. The promise: help talented people find affordable and comfortable spaces around the world that they can grow from, where the basics are included and the value is ever-growing.

Spaces available for mobile workers

Their network now features and connects 37 independently owned spaces and their communities, with targets to further expand in Europe and a US launch shortly. As well as their geographic growth, they’re also working hard on promoting more entrepreneur-friendly packages – from communications to travel to fixed-price legal services.

One could argue that real estate prices and a global market for investment in real estate as a secure investment also contributes to the surge of these hybrid co-working offices – and that this growth is less the fact of a change in the way people do business, and more of a consequence of non-affordable office spaces.

The potential to grow a generation of migrant and mobile entrepreneurs

Whatever this growth of collaborative spaces may be -the consequences of a crisis of affordable office space or reflective of a change in the way business is done – included.co’s offer of inter-connected co-working spaces is promising for a generation of global entrepreneurs moving to the capitals of Europe.

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It makes it more accessible to do business from one or several capitals of Europe – enabling migrant entrepreneurs to move different location everyday to do daily business without extra rental costs, connect with potential new business partners by their desk and enjoy free coffee.

Will this revolution create a new pan-European business scene and help migrant entrepreneurs think of Europe as one single market? It is difficult to say yet – but for sure, non-EU nationals will still need to show valid visas at the borders.

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